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Is Your Dog Afraid of Fireworks and Loud Noises? Here’s How To Help.

The Fourth of July is on the horizon and people are gearing up to enjoy fireworks and general summer vibes. However, keep in mind that this holiday isn’t always a favorite for your four-legged-friends.

Animal Control Services see a 30% increase in lost pets from July 4th - July 6th. From howling to hiding, there are several obvious and sometimes subtle cues that your dogs may be stressed. If you know your dog has issues with fireworks and noise, we’ve collected some expert solutions that may be able to help your dog out this summer.

1. Stay In a Safe Environment and Prevent Escapes

You don’t want your dog to be one of the many that go missing over the Fourth of July. If your dog gets scared of fireworks, keep them inside as much as possible in a comfortable space where they feel safe. 

Additionally, make sure your dog's identification is up to date. This way, you have a better chance of finding your furry companion if they get spooked or run away.

READ: Why Your Dog Needs Hearing Protection

2. Rex Specs Ear Pro Hearing Protection

Originally developed to support Military Working Dogs, Rex Specs Ear Pro is designed to reduce environmental noise that dogs are exposed to. While the protection does take some training to get your dog used to it (do this before the Fourth of July!), the sound-blocking material will help decrease noise from fireworks and keep your pooch comfortable all through the fireworks.

For one dog owner, Becky Wessels, the Ear Pro has been the only thing that’s helped her dog feel comfortable during fireworks. Without the Ear Pro, Wessels says “He was absolutely terrified, he would shake uncontrollably and hide in the bathroom.” 

With the Ear Pro, “It’s a complete game changer!” Says Wessels. “He now runs to his Ear Pro the second he hears the first sound of a firework and relaxes almost instantly once he has them on!”

 

Dog wearing Rex Specs Ear Pro to help block noise caused by fireworks.


3. Give Positive Reinforcement

Offer treats, playtime, or anything that offers a helpful distraction and makes your pup happy. You may have heard the concept of leaving your dog alone and not rewarding bad behavior, but here’s the thing: your dog isn’t acting out for the sake of acting out. They’re trying to communicate.

Instead, give your pup lots of love. By providing comfort, treats, and love, you communicate to them that the loud noises aren’t a threat (and are actually a good thing because it means they get treats!). If your dog is really freaked, they may be too anxious to be interested in love, treats, or play, so it’s best to start this strategy before their anxiety level has gone up or primarily use it for dogs with only mild phobias.

4. Ask Your Vet About Medications

In some instances, a relaxer or sedative can help relieve stress. If you want to try this strategy, be sure to talk to your vet about what type and dose would be best for your dog and when to have your dog take it.

5. Try a Pressure Wrap or Calming Vest

A wrap, vest, or shirt provides constant pressure around your dog’s body that simulates being held and releases calming hormones and endorphins. Results of these products may vary based on the dog or situation, but if your dog is generally anxious, it might be something worth trying. Rex Specs Ear Pro has a similar effect. 


Finally, if you know your dog gets scared during fireworks, it may be best to forgo the live show and stay home to comfort your dog. With these tips, we hope both you and your dog can have a fun and safe Fourth of July!


SHOP: Rex Specs Ear Pro


Have you found anything else that works? Let us know below in the comments!

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Gear For your Dog

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Lens Guide

Lens

UV Rating

VLT*

Durability

Recommended Use

Red Mirror

Blocks 99% of UVA and UVB Rays.

Allows 20% of light to pass. Very similar to sunglasses.

Impact Resistant. Mirrored lenses show more scratches than clear or smoke.

Giddy up! The Red Mirror lens is great for most dogs and is very similar to the smoke lens with a bit more style.

Clear

Blocks 99% of UVA and UVB

Allows 92% of light to pass

Impact Resistant. Offers best visibility when scratched.

For Everything except protection from brightness. Great for working, hunting or adventure dogs. Blocks UV is impact resistant and often is preferred by dogs. Great training lens, and when it gets scratched the scratches are not as visible to the dog as with other lens options.

Blue Mirror

Blocks 99% of UVA and UVB

Allows 15% of light to pass. Slightly darker than smoke and red mirror.

Impact Resistant. Mirrored lenses show more scratches than clear or smoke

DM's are rolling in! The Blue Mirror lens adds a touch of flare and is one of our darker lenses for dogs who have sensitivity to light. Perfect for use in sunny areas and for those who love that blue mirror look.

Silver Mirror

Blocks 99% of UVA and UVB

Allows 13% of light to pass. Our darkest lens.

Impact Resistant. Mirrored lenses show more scratches than clear or smoke.

STYLE! Add some flavor to the daily grind with our darkest lens, allowing only 13% of visual light to pass through, making it the best option if your dog has light sensitivity.

Smoke

Blocks 99% of UVA and UVB

Allows 20% of light to pass. Very similar to sunglasses.

Impact Resistant. Offers excellent visibility when scratched.

For everything! Overall the most versatile lens. Great for dogs that are rough on their equipment as it continues to offer good visibility when scratched.F

Green Mirror

Blocks 99% of UVA and UVB

Allows 15% of light to pass. Slightly darker than smoke and red mirror.

Impact Resistant. Mirrored lenses show more scratches than clear or smoke.

The Green Mirror lens adds a touch of flare and is one of our darker lenses for dogs that need some reprieve from the suns brightness.

*VLT = Visual Light Transmission

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Rex Specs

measure your dog in two steps

  1. muzzle circumference

    Measure the circumference of your dog's muzzle where you expect the goggle to land on their nose - usually around the back of their mouth.

  2. head circumference

    Measure the head circumference where you expect the goggle to land on the forehead - typically an inch or so behind the eyes.

Watch Sizing Video
Goggle Size Head Circumference Muzzle Circumference
X-Small Less than 10.5 in Less than 6 in SHOP X-Small
Small 10.5 in - 12 in 6 in - 8 in SHOP Small
Medium 12 in - 14 in 8 in - 9in SHOP Medium
Large 14 in - 17.5 in 9 in - 11.5 in SHOP Large
X-Large Greater than 17.5 in Greater than 11.5 in SHOP X-Large
Small Wide* 12 in - 15 in 6 in - 9 in SHOP Small Wide

*Designed for dogs with a wide, flat face i.e. Boston Terriers
If your dog is between sizes, select the larger size: This will insure the most functional fit and optimal field of view.

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Ear Pro Fit Graphic

EAR PRO SIZE GUIDE

Measure the circumference of your dog's head at it's largest point (just in front of the ears and under the chin). If you are between sizes, please go up in size.

SIZE

HEAD MEASUREMENT

2 13" - 15" SHOP Size 2
3 15" - 17.5" SHOP Size 3
4 17.5" - 21" SHOP Size 4
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CRUX & TRAILHEAD COLLAR SIZE GUIDE

Measure around the dog's neck as loose or tight as you would like the collar to fit.

SIZE

NECK MEASUREMENT

1 12"-14" SHOP Size 1
2 14"-16.5" SHOP Size 2
3 16.5"-19.5" SHOP Size 3
4 19.5"-24" SHOP Size 4

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