FREE SHIPPING ON US ORDERS OVER $100

How Your Dogs Eyes Differ from Yours

“Fetch that red ball.”

“Bring me your green rope.”

Have you had any success with these play commands?

Even though your dog is super smart, it’s difficult to teach him differences in colors. His color vision doesn’t align with most people’s, says Steve Roberts, DVM, ophthalmologist, and owner of the Animal Eye Center in Loveland, Colorado. 

“In the social structure of a dog, color is not as important as it is to us,” says Dr. Roberts. “As far as physical structure, dogs have rod and cone cells like people, but dogs (as well as most animals) don’t have cones that are good at detecting red-colored light.”

So basically, he says, dogs are red-green color blind. However, their cones are quite sensitive to blue and green light. 


Physical Differences 

The variations in the construction of the two eyes aren’t always black and white. For example, because of the variety of physical sizes of dogs, they also have a disparity in the size of their eyes. To put that in perspective, larger dog breeds have about the same size eyes as humans.

Dr. Roberts says the basic structure of the eye is similar, but the diameter of the cornea in a dog is larger than a human’s resulting in a larger iris. A dog’s pupil is capable of dilating or opening to a larger diameter than a person’s and the lens measures three-to-four times that of a human. 

Another difference humans don’t have, that’s seen in both domestic and wild animals, he explains, is the reflective layer behind the retina called the tapetum lucidum. This layer reflects light back across the retina and out of the eye giving the animal the eye shine that can be detected at night when shining a light toward him.

Dogs track movement better than people because of their visual streak, a feature humans don’t have. It’s a horizontal band across the retina, above the optic nerve head, that contains a high concentration of cone receptors, clarifies Dr. Roberts.

“This visual streak allows dogs to be good at detecting subtle horizontal movements,” clarifies Dr. Roberts. “They may not immediately recognize exactly what the moving object is, but they can track the movement and quickly adjust their movements to approach and attempt to catch the moving object.”

Canines also have different structures that produce and remove the watery fluid within the eye and an extra set of muscles behind the eye. These muscles allow a dog to retract the entire eye ball deeper into the eye socket, something humans can’t do, he says.

 

Structural Differences

Your “best friend” has less sharpness of vision than you do. Where perfect sight for us is 20:20, for your dog, it’s 20:70-20:80.

“That means they see about one-third to one-fourth of the detail that we do,” describes Dr. Roberts. 

Because the visual acuity or sharpness of vision in a dog is less than that of a person, minor scratches on their goggles won’t bother a dog as much as they would a person. However, if you look through a scratched pair of Rex Specs and feel that the dog’s vision is being impacted by more than 30-50 percent, then the dog is likely also being affected and the lenses should be replaced, Dr. Roberts explains.

Do dogs see better at night than we do?

“Because the dog’s eye is designed to let more light enter the eye, their night vision is superior to that of a person. At least as far as seeing an overall image, with shape recognition and motion detection,” says Dr. Roberts.

Dogs do better in the dark than humans because of their rod-dominated retina. Their rod photoreceptors function at a low level of light while their cones do well at bright light levels. All these differences have created a system in dogs that is better suited for low light activities than people are.

If you had to use your backyard as a bathroom at night, you’d probably have an eye structure similar to a dog.

Older Post
Newer Post

1 comment

  • If your pet has glaucoma in one eye does this product help and can they swim with them on

    Sidney Lombardino

Leave a comment

Please note, comments must be approved before they are published

Gear For your Dog

×

Lens Guide

Lens

UV Rating

VLT*

Durability

Recommended Use

Red Mirror

Blocks 99% of UVA and UVB Rays.

Allows 20% of light to pass. Very similar to sunglasses.

Impact Resistant. Mirrored lenses show more scratches than clear or smoke.

Giddy up! The Red Mirror lens is great for most dogs and is very similar to the smoke lens with a bit more style.

Clear

Blocks 99% of UVA and UVB

Allows 92% of light to pass

Impact Resistant. Offers best visibility when scratched.

For Everything except protection from brightness. Great for working, hunting or adventure dogs. Blocks UV is impact resistant and often is preferred by dogs. Great training lens, and when it gets scratched the scratches are not as visible to the dog as with other lens options.

Blue Mirror

Blocks 99% of UVA and UVB

Allows 15% of light to pass. Slightly darker than smoke and red mirror.

Impact Resistant. Mirrored lenses show more scratches than clear or smoke

DM's are rolling in! The Blue Mirror lens adds a touch of flare and is one of our darker lenses for dogs who have sensitivity to light. Perfect for use in sunny areas and for those who love that blue mirror look.

Silver Mirror

Blocks 99% of UVA and UVB

Allows 13% of light to pass. Our darkest lens.

Impact Resistant. Mirrored lenses show more scratches than clear or smoke.

STYLE! Add some flavor to the daily grind with our darkest lens, allowing only 13% of visual light to pass through, making it the best option if your dog has light sensitivity.

Smoke

Blocks 99% of UVA and UVB

Allows 20% of light to pass. Very similar to sunglasses.

Impact Resistant. Offers excellent visibility when scratched.

For everything! Overall the most versatile lens. Great for dogs that are rough on their equipment as it continues to offer good visibility when scratched.F

Green Mirror

Blocks 99% of UVA and UVB

Allows 15% of light to pass. Slightly darker than smoke and red mirror.

Impact Resistant. Mirrored lenses show more scratches than clear or smoke.

The Green Mirror lens adds a touch of flare and is one of our darker lenses for dogs that need some reprieve from the suns brightness.

*VLT = Visual Light Transmission

Close (esc)

Popup

Use this popup to embed a mailing list sign up form. Alternatively use it as a simple call to action with a link to a product or a page.

×
Rex Specs

measure your dog in two steps

  1. muzzle circumference

    Measure the circumference of your dog's muzzle where you expect the goggle to land on their nose - usually around the back of their mouth.

  2. head circumference

    Measure the head circumference where you expect the goggle to land on the forehead - typically an inch or so behind the eyes.

Watch Sizing Video
Goggle Size Head Circumference Muzzle Circumference
X-Small Less than 10.5 in Less than 6 in SHOP X-Small
Small 10.5 in - 12 in 6 in - 8 in SHOP Small
Medium 12 in - 14 in 8 in - 9in SHOP Medium
Large 14 in - 17.5 in 9 in - 11.5 in SHOP Large
X-Large Greater than 17.5 in Greater than 11.5 in SHOP X-Large
Small Wide* 12 in - 15 in 6 in - 9 in SHOP Small Wide

*Designed for dogs with a wide, flat face i.e. Boston Terriers
If your dog is between sizes, select the larger size: This will insure the most functional fit and optimal field of view.

×
Ear Pro Fit Graphic

EAR PRO SIZE GUIDE

Measure the circumference of your dog's head at it's largest point (just in front of the ears and under the chin).

SIZE

HEAD MEASUREMENT

2 13" - 15" SHOP Size 2
3 15" - 17.5" SHOP Size 3
4 17.5" - 21" SHOP Size 4
×

CRUX & TRAILHEAD COLLAR SIZE GUIDE

Measure around the dog's neck as loose or tight as you would like the collar to fit.

SIZE

NECK MEASUREMENT

1 12"-14" SHOP Size 1
2 14"-16.5" SHOP Size 2
3 16.5"-19.5" SHOP Size 3
4 19.5"-24" SHOP Size 4

Search

Shopping Cart

Your cart is currently empty.
Shop now