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5 Reasons Your Dog Needs Eye Protection

When you first came across Rex Specs was your initial thought, "Cool, but why?" You're not the first. We get asked on a regular basis What are they for? and it's a question we love answering.

Photo: @girlsmeetsmerle

Reason #1: Your Dog’s Eyes are Crying for UV Protection

The bright sun at high elevations is the original reason Rex Specs were born -- our boy Tuckerman was diagnosed with pannus, an autoimmune disease that can lead to blindness through over-exposure to UV rays. We were devastated when the vet told us we should limit Tucky’s outside time during the day -- we all want our dogs to come with us on the activities we enjoy, and so many of these activities happen in the middle of the day when the sun is at its peak. Less than a week later, our other dog, Yaz, was ‘prescribed’ top wear sunglasses or goggles due to chronic sunburn on her eyelid that lacked pigment. Years of UV exposure had become apparent and it was causing irreversible damage. We took our frustrations and turned them into ideas -- first by strapping up sunglasses and ski goggles (you gotta start somewhere, right?) and eventually coming out with the go-to-dog-goggle for UV protection, with all of our lenses blocking 99.9% UVA and UVB rays. And since our dogs are as extreme as we are, the goggles stay in place for the biggest of adventures.

Photo: Drew Smith

Photo: Drew Smith

 

While just a few decades ago dogs didn’t wear sunglasses, get vaccinated, wear doggy jackets, or even have a water bowl inside, the fact is, we treat our dogs differently these days. They’re our companions, friends, and family. So for those that are at risk for sunburn, pannus, or other exposure-related eye conditions, Rex Specs can help your pup live a long, healthy, adventurous life.

Photo: @bigkansasoutdoors

Reason #2: Your Hunting Dog Would Rather be in the Field than at Home

Look no further than the experience of Ben Webster who runs Big Kansas Outdoors -- a full service waterfowl and upland hunting operation in Kansas. He’s been hunting for 16 years and originally looked into buying Rex Specs “because my dog Otis is an extremely hard charging dog. He had a few minor eye injuries 2 years ago. Then, last year my dog ran straight through a fallen tree, a piece of bark was stuck in his cornea, and thankfully they were able to save the eye and he made a full recovery....I finally decided to purchase some Specs.  Both my dogs wear them on any hunt that I feel there’s even a minor possibility of danger to their eyes”

 


Or, maybe you’re like Cody, a customer who’s dog Blue juggles his two jobs of family dog and hardcore upland hunter with ease. After Blue’s first year in the brush without eye protection, Cody saw the warning signs and got in touch. “He’s not just my dog -- he’s my wife’s dog, too -- so if I bring him back in any other shape than perfect, I may as well be moving out,” he half-joked with us. Since then, we’ve had loads of hunters reaching out for injury prevention. Getting a hunting dog to reach his potential takes years, and it’s beyond a bummer when your born and bred gun dog is out for the season (or for good). Common sense is all it takes, as our trainers like to remind us. If you’re protecting yourself -- be it with eye protection, ear protection, body protection -- and you’re bringing your dog into the same situation, get them protected, too.

Photo: Drew Smith

Photo: Drew Smith

Reason #3: Your Dog Doesn’t F$%& Around

Got a dog who’s idea of heaven is the light I-95 breeze while her head hangs out the window at 80mph? Maybe your BFF loves the beach -- and getting sand everywhere, including in his eyes. Or perhaps you’ve got one of those pups who’s relentlessly sniffing out the next big thing in thick brush or seedy, sharp grasses. And let’s face it, most of us have a squirrel chaser.

Photo: Drew Smith

Now take a step back and think about the last time you tried keeping your eyes open in an 80mph -- or even 50mph -- breeze? And what about the bee, bug, or pebble that hits you dead on the one time you do it? Would you ride a motorcycle without eye protection? Highly doubtful, but so many of us get a sidecar just so our dogs can come along for the next great motorcyce adventure.


Whether you classify your dog as a working dog, hunting dog, window surfer, squirrel chaser, beach bum, or adventure pal, at some point they’re at risk of an eye injury. Just how serious that might be can either be left up to luck and rolling the dice, or taking prevention into your own hands. No matter what ‘job’ your dog is doing – if they’re at risk of injuring an eye Rex Specs might be the piece of gear you’re looking for.

Photo: @usgck9

Reason #4: Your Dog Works as Hard as You Do

As soon as we launched Rex Specs, we knew we wanted a product that was approved to protect our hardest working dogs in the toughest situations. Since then, military and working K-9s have used Rex Specs everywhere from protecting the president to drug raids with deadly doses of fentanyl to helicopter jumps with the US Coast Guard. And of course, we’ll never forget K-9 Piper, the world-famous border collie who worked tirelessly to chase birds and wildlife off runways to give us safe take offs and landings.

 

Search and Rescue teams are utilizing Rex Specs with their avalanche dogs, border patrol agents use Rex Specs with their K-9s, and military K-9s overseas in active duty utilize Rex Specs to keep dust, rotor wash, and even shrapnel out of their eyes. We take our job seriously -- our goggles have passed the ANSI Z87.1-2010 impact resistance test to keep working K-9s safe under any conditions. So if you’re a working K-9 handler, you know your dog’s gear is equally as important as your own. We’re proud to help you and your K-9 serve.

Reason #5: You’ve Got a Medical Necessity

Do you have a blind dog, or a dog with chronic allergies, or maybe a dog that’s lost one eye due to trauma, or even a dog with iris atrophy? Often, these conditions end up with a restless dog living indoors and a restless owner panicking about how to give them a decent quality of life.

We’ve had some amazing stories sent to us where Rex Specs gave new life to dogs with these conditions, from a blind dog that went on to become an agility champion to a German Shepherd with pannus who’s a Schutzhund superstar to a deaf and blind double merle puppy who became a master trick dog and started a nonprofit.

So whether you’re trying to protect your visually impaired buddy from bumping into sticks or objects around the backyard, or if your pup loves being off leash and being part of the gang regardless of his vision, you can give yourself and your dog relief by grabbing a pair of Rex Specs. Similarly, if you’ve got a dog with only one eye, Rex Specs can help keep the “good eye” healthy and prevent other injuries from happening. All Rex Specs lenses are scratch resistant, and we have tinted options for dogs who are especially sensitive to bright sunlight.

 

Available in 6 sizes, from Chihuahua’s to Great Danes, Rex Specs are the ‘go to’ eye protection for dogs. They offer a stable, secure fit – and are 99.9% UV protective. Here’s 5 reasons you might consider Rex Specs for your fur child.



4 comments

  • Ed Richards on

    You forgot the 6th Reason for wearing REX SPECS →>> They make your dog look Cool !!!

  • MErrillyn cOllins on

    I have a 10 yr old dog with cloudy eyes & dry eye syndrome; Yorkie mix, 16
    Lbs., lives outside Phoenix Az.

  • Barbara on

    Please send me more info re rex specs, models and sizing. Thanks!

  • Julia on

    How do I purchase one? My dog has retina atrophy and severe allergies

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How To Measure

Measure the circumference of your dog's muzzle where you expect the goggle to land on their nose - usually around the back of their mouth.

Measure the head circumference where you expect the goggle to land on the forehead - typically an inch or so behind the eyes.